August 26th-28th

Video Reviews:


Passcode: w4@.tch8




Passcode: w4@.tch8


Themes & Sequencing

Theming

Themes are the most critical component of the class. You are setting the stage for what is to come and making it meaningful to the students. In just a few minutes you can penetrate the heart and change someone’s entire day. Following the formula below you can help to organize your thinking and introduce the theme in a way that uplifts your students.


Introduction to the Theme (the 3- step process):

The 3 steps do not have to happen in this order. You may choose to start with Universalizing the theme, then give context, followed by a personal anecdote.

1. Personalize it, or name it/the lead in. Share a brief personal anecdote or experience related to the theme that will inspire your students.

Tips - Be authentic and appropriate. Teach from your experience, make it relatable. Be brief and succinct.

Avoid – Refrain from giving too much information about your personal process. If you cannot speak without geting overly emotional, choose another theme. Do not make it too long. In a 60 minutes class, your entire introduction/centering should, not last more than 5 min.

Example: Theme of “seed and tree”

Personal Anecdote: “Yesterday I was sitting under a large oak tree in the park reveling in the beauty and strength of the tree. Suddenly an acorn fell right on my head. I picked it and thought that this gigantic tree originated as this very tiny seed.”


2. Contextualize it. Make it more meaningful and expand the idea so it relates to nature or reality. If the theme is about nature- how is the theme relates to the body/life? If the

theme is about a heart virtue- why does it matter? What is possible if you have it in your life? Who is an example of someone who became more effective, successful, loving because they developed this quality.

Example: Theme of “tree and seed”, heart virtue “patience”

Contextualize: Just as a whole oak tree is contained in the acorn seed, a full spectrum of the possibilities of life is contained in you. An acorn seed never tries to push the process. It takes time for the seed to emerge into the fully formed tree. Sometimes we push ourselves too soon into a pose. It takes patience and practice to open the body to be able to do that particular pose.


3. Universalize it. Tie it back to the grand purpose of yoga. The highest purpose of yoga is to remember/realize/revel our true nature which is awareness and joy/peace (Chit Ananda).

Example: Theme “seed and tree.”

Universalize: Even though the seed does not look like a tree, it contains all of the elements and characteristics of the tree. The universal energy that is in that seed is also in you. It is aware and pulses with the delight. The practice of yoga helps us to reconnect to the universal energy to fully experience life and fulfil our purpose. One of the goals of practice is to help us to become awake and aware though our senses to all reality around us and within us at the same time.

not last more than 5 min.

Example: Theme of “seed and tree”

Personal Anecdote: “Yesterday I was sitting under a large oak tree in the park reveling in the beauty and strength of the tree. Suddenly an acorn fell right on my head. I picked it and thought that this gigantic tree originated as this very tiny seed.”


 

Themes in connection with Philosophy & Sequencing

Samples of Theming During Centering


Because the centering part occurs within the first 5-10 minutes of the class, it is one of the most

important components of the class to integrate your theme. Below are examples of weaving

the theme into centering part of the class. No matter what theme you choose and what actions

you are focusing upon, you can pulse back to 1st principle, Open to Grace. It is an opportunity to

soften and open to the greater power of the universe.

DO NOT do this at every phrase of the centering. These are suggestions to play with and create

variety in the tapestry of your class.

1. Taking a comfortable seat. (Take a seat worthy of the greatness of your heart. Theme:

Hanuman-Honor your Greatness.)

2. Breath. (Soften and become more receptive As you inhale, visualize your inner light

becoming brighter and more radian. It is filling you from inside out. As you exhale,

release any limiting beliefs that might cloud the inner light. Theme- Drawin/Radiate

Out.)

3. Setting an intention. (Let’s set a collective intention to honor our ancestors and those

who have gone before us. Theme- Halloween, honoring our ancestors.)

4. Anjali Mudra. (Bring your palms together in the hart space in a way that expresses your

intention to connect to the playful nature inside of you. Theme- Lila/Play.)

5. Invocation/OM. (With one harmonious voice, one heart, let’s chant OM. This invocation


reminds us that we are all connected to the same light of awareness. Theme-

Community.)


6. Bowing your head to the heart. (To the infinite source of power within you, bow your

head to your courageous heart. Theme- Courageous Heart.)


Samples of Theming During Centering


Because the centering part occurs within the first 5-10 minutes of the class, it is one of the most

important components of the class to integrate your theme. Below are examples of weaving

the theme into centering part of the class. No matter what theme you choose and what actions

you are focusing upon, you can pulse back to 1st principle, Open to Grace. It is an opportunity to

soften and open to the greater power of the universe.

DO NOT do this at every phrase of the centering. These are suggestions to play with and create

variety in the tapestry of your class.

1. Taking a comfortable seat. (Take a seat worthy of the greatness of your heart. Theme:

Hanuman-Honor your Greatness.)

2. Breath. (Soften and become more receptive As you inhale, visualize your inner light

becoming brighter and more radian. It is filling you from inside out. As you exhale,

release any limiting beliefs that might cloud the inner light. Theme- Drawin/Radiate

Out.)

3. Setting an intention. (Let’s set a collective intention to honor our ancestors and those

who have gone before us. Theme- Halloween, honoring our ancestors.)

4. Anjali Mudra. (Bring your palms together in the hart space in a way that expresses your

intention to connect to the playful nature inside of you. Theme- Lila/Play.)

5. Invocation/OM. (With one harmonious voice, one heart, let’s chant OM. This invocation


reminds us that we are all connected to the same light of awareness. Theme-

Community.)


6. Bowing your head to the heart. (To the infinite source of power within you, bow your

head to your courageous heart. Theme- Courageous Heart.)


Sample #1. Theme- Receive and Give.

Take a comfortable seat. Soften and open to your breath. Become receptive so that you may

receive each breath fully. Keeping full on the inside with the inhalation, exhale and let ypur hips

settle into the floor. Take a few breathes in and out. Allow yourself to receive on the inhalation

and give back on the exhalation. (Observe the class and make sure your students sitting

postures are correctly done because it can inhibit their breaths. Instruct the alignment in the

hips and legs, ribcage and head.) With every inhalation open your ribs and invite deeper breath

in. Exhale and offer back. Feel grace in the form of breath and soften. As you connect with this

powerful presence of grace, set an intention to receive fully so that you may be able to give

fully from a place of wholeness.


Sample #2. Theme- Lakshmi/Fullness.

Sit up keeping your inner body bright. Let your outer body/tissue to drape softly over that inner

fullness. Let your hips to settle down into the earth. (Observe your students. Instruct if their

poses are collapsed.) Become aware of the pulsation of your breath. Observe the waves- the

beginning, middle, and the end of the breath. Notice the pause between the breaths.

Everything in nature pulses with this same creative cycle- beginning, middle, end and the space

between. Notice the fullness at the top of your inhale. Maintain an inner fullness and radiance

even as you exhale. (After the chant if you choose to do so) May we all experience the fullness

of life force during this practice today. Keeping your heart lifted and your inner body bright,

bow your head to your heart.


Sample #3. Theme- Dedication.

I was first introduced to yoga in 1992 back in my country when my mother showed me Sun

Salutation A. She asked me to do it with her as we face the rising sun. I reluctantly agreed. As I

was repeating what she was doing behind her, I felt amazing and secretly loved it. But I was at

an age of rebellion late teen and told her I that it felt ok. Remembering how I felt, years later in

the United States, I found a book on Hatha Yoga. I started practicing all the poses in the book

and shortly after, I got pain in my joints. I had not realized that I was very flexible and injured

myself doing the poses without guidance of a qualified teacher. Few years passed without

practice; but I always longed to do it, especially meditation. I found a studio and started going

there. One weekend one of the prominent yoga teachers was teaching a workshop. I showed

up and left that workshop feeling never the same. The instructor was constantly correcting me

pointing to me my hyperextension. She emphasized the tone of the muscles. Next day I couldn’t

get up from my bed without wincing. All of my muscles were sore.

I found same style of yoga teachers who were teaching close to my place and rededicated my

practice. I have learned about my body and movements so much it inspired me to dive in into

their teacher training. I wanted to teach like them and help others.

What I discovered is that when I practice yoga with dedication, I become more loving, present,

and patient with myself.


 

Sunday: Themes in connection with Anatomy & Sequencing





Stick Figures & Layouts


stickfigures
.pdf
Download PDF • 5.72MB


 

The Art of Sequencing

Sequencing refers to the way in which the yoga class is structured from beginning to end. Good sequencing makes the class enjoyable as well as safe for the body. When sequencing is done intelligently, it adequately prepares the body for the intensity level of the poses. Sequencing is what allows the body to open to its full potential without injury, naturally over time. When you arrange the sequencing with the 5 principles of alignment, you’ll be amazed how quickly the body will progress with increased strength, endurance, and flexibility. In general, you want to practice and offer your students a well-rounded template of postures.


Sequencing types:


1. The Arc of Your Class.


Move from Simple to Complex Movements:

Movements should range from simple to complex in each category of asana. For instance, when teaching backbends, start with baby backbends, i.e., Salabhasana (Locust Pose), Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose), and Setu Bandhasana (Bridge Pose). Then, progress to Dhanurasana (Wheel Pose), Ustrasana (Camel Pose). Finally do Urdva Dhanurasana (Upward Facing Wheel).

Contour of a Wave:

The class should have a contour of a wave. It starts slow and calm, then builds and rises towards the crest of the wave. Then the crest of the wave breaks, and the wave returns

to a state of calm and quiet. In brief, the sequence goes like this: Centering and Intention, Warmups, Asanas that build to the pinnacle pose, Pinnacle pose, Quieting poses that relax the body and the nervous system, Savasana or Assimilation pose.



Build to an Apex (or Pinnacle) Pose:

Choose an apex pose and build up to it. The apex pose is like the crest of the wave just before it breaks. It’s the peak experience of the class and it usually is the most intense or challenging posture of the class. All the asanas preceding the apex pose should be in same way build up to the apex pose. They should help to warm up, open, and teach the principle/s necessary to perform the apex pose safely. All the preceding poses set the foundation and pave the way for the apex pose. The apex pose should be placed in the last third quarter of the class.


Cool Down and Prepare for the Closing:

After the apex pose, teach more quieting poses to help release any compression from the apex pose. In general, cooling poses would include forward bends, twists, and gentle hip openers.


2. Categories of Asanas and their impact.



Warm-ups and Surya Namaskar:

Warm-ups heat the spine, legs, and arms. San Salutes encompass all categories of asana to gently open the body.


Standing Poses: Standing poses are best at the beginning of the class since they build heat, stability, foundation, and confidence. They are easiest poses for beginners to get a low back curve. Tips: End the standing sequencing with a symmetrical pose, i.e., Uttanasana (Standing Forward Fold), Utkatasana (Chair Pose) rather than an asymmetrical pose like Trikonasana (Triangle Pose). For the raw beginners, the standing pose can be an apex pose. Simple to complex.


Hand Balances:

This category of poses is best done after half way though the class, since they require a lot of strength in hands, arms, and shoulders. The upper body needs to be warmed up but not exhausted. Tips: There are myriad of hand balancing poses. Each one requires

certain actions.


For example, Bakasana (Crane or Crow Pose) is a rounded position with both hands on the ground and both legs are in a symmetrical position. This is very different than Ashta Vakrasana (Eight Angle Pose) where you are balancing on one hand with the leg behind the shoulder. Each of these poses would require a different warm up if it were the apex pose.



Abdominals:

It is helpful to practice these after the legs and groins are opened. Tips: For the beginners it is not recommended to go from abdominal work right into a deep backband. If your students are weaker in the core, abdominal work beforehand

balancing poses can help. Remember to emphasize working the deep core muscles and if the legs are outstretched, keep the thighbones back so the work is not happening in the hip flexors.


Basic Hip Openers:

Hip openers help open the body for backbends, ground the energy and give the students an opportunity to come to the floor before back bends. They also open the body for twists and forward folds. This is why Eka Pada Rajakapotasana (One Legged King Pigeon Pose) is often included in a class. Tips: Hip openers that are done in standing poses are easier for everybody because the movement of the hips is not limited by the floor. If Half Pigeon is not accessible to your students because of the weakness or pain in the knees, Succirandrasana (Eye of a Needle Pose) is more appropriate for them. By the way, Eye of the Needle can be performed supine.


Handstand and Shoulderstand:

Sirsasana and Sharvangasana are the King and the Queen of the all asanas. Tips: Beginners need some years practicing before they attempt these poses. Use props for the Shoulderstand for your beginners. Fish pose is a counter balancing pose to the Shoulderstand. If the student/s have neck vertebrae issues, work on building strength on the back of the neck and opening and releasing the front before they attempt to do both of these poses. Headstand is heating in nature and Shoulderstand is cooling, so placing them accordingly in your sequence.


Backbends:

Backbends are invigorating and build back muscles. One of the benefits of practicing them is reversing the biological age. Tips: before backbends, open the 4 corners of the body- hips and shoulders. Open the quadriceps, hip flexors, hamstrings, low back. Shalabhasana (Bridge Pose) is one of the best back strengtheners. Twists performed right after the deep backbends are the best followed by forward Folds. A good cool down sequence after the backbend/s could be Adho Muckha Shvanasana (Downward Facing Dog) Uttanasana (Standing Forward forld), Parsva Uttanasana (Side intense Forward Fold), Parsva Upavishtha Konasana (Seated Side Angle pose), Ardha Matsyendrasana (Half Lord of the Fishes Pose), Paschimottanasana (Intense Forward Fold Pose), and Supta Balsana (Happy Baby Pose.) If you are doing both Sirsasana and Sharvangasana AND backbends, do Sharvangasana after the back bends.


Twists:

Twists are neutralizing and balancing poses. They tend to cool and calm the nervous system if you are too hot and energized. Cooling twist are best placed at the end of the class, but some energizing twist can be performed in standing poses too. Tips: twists should be ONLY done in the thoracic and cervical areas of the spine. NOT in the lumbar spine. And certainly not in the hips and SI joints. Remember, the discs in the lumbar bulge and herniate during very deep twist. No forced hands-on adjustments!


Forward Folds:

They are calming and introspective. Tips: A good Inner spiral is a must in this category of poses. Rather than instructing your students to round their backs as soon as they are fold forward, instruct them to elongate through the spine forward and up. After they reach their limit in this instruction, they can round their back gently. The glutes have to be engaged to support the lower back. Legs have to be energetically engaged to support the fold.

Shavasana and Meditation and closing the class:


It is very important that your students stay during Shavasana because the brain plays backwards what they just practiced and they need at least 3 minutes to assimilate it. This is how we remember things.


Here is Huberman lab podcast on how brain works to improve the memory: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/huberman lab/id1545953110?i=1000550287046


Use of various props during Shavasana are recommended if you have time.

Meditation and closing the class.




 

Krama- Order, Logic, Efficacy, and Efficiency


Effective ordering of the Categories of asanas to create a well-rounded class following Krama:

Nature has Krama- intelligent order nature builds in a wise and efficient progression. Everything

is seated in innate intelligence and has elegance to it.


Before designing your practice or class, ask “What do I want to accomplish? What is the most

effective way to get there?”. Depending on what you want to offer, the asanas will change.

Sometimes you can offer a potpourri class with a little bit of everything, like a potluck dinner.

Other times, you will want to be very focused and specific. Your practice and your students

practice will deepen if you alternate categories of asanas.


There are 4 main programs you can build:

1. Basic forward Folds, Hip Openers, and Twists

2. Deep forward bends, Hip Openers and Twists (more challenging and held for a longer

timing.)

3. Basic Backbends

4. Up-tempo back Bends and Hand Balancing


In addition, you can do a class with Standing Poses, Basic Hip Openers, Hand Balancing and then

cool down with Twists and Forward Folds.

So much of this will depend on your students and what you have integrated in yourself! To plan

a class, you can go down the list of categories of asanas listed above sequentially and choose

the components that are relevant to your class.


The concept of a pinnacle or apex pose and how to build up to it in an orderly way:

1. What body parts need to strengthen?

2. What body parts need to stretch and open?

3. What key alignment principles or actions are necessary for success in this pose?

4. What preparatory poses would help?

Tips: Take your actual pose and look at it from various angles. What the pose looks like lying

down or seated, or upside down? Do the poses in your body and check it out! Know what

needed for the apex pose and make sure the students can do it. Have an alternate plan, a

variation, or modification for those who need it.


Effective ordering of the Categories of asanas to create a well-rounded class following Krama:

Nature has Krama- intelligent order nature builds in a wise and efficient progression. Everything

is seated in innate intelligence and has elegance to it.

Before designing your practice or class, ask “What do I want to accomplish? What is the most

effective way to get there?”. Depending on what you want to offer, the asanas will change.

Sometimes you can offer a potpourri class with a little bit of everything, like a potluck dinner.

Other times, you will want to be very focused and specific. Your practice and your students

practice will deepen if you alternate categories of asanas.


There are 4 main programs you can build:

1. Basic forward Folds, Hip Openers, and Twists

2. Deep forward bends, Hip Openers and Twists (more challenging and held for a longer

timing.)

3. Basic Backbends

4. Up-tempo back Bends and Hand Balancing

In addition, you can do a class with Standing Poses, Basic Hip Openers, Hand Balancing and then

cool down with Twists and Forward Folds.

So much of this will depend on your students and what you have integrated in yourself! To plan

a class, you can go down the list of categories of asanas listed above sequentially and choose

the components that are relevant to your class.


The concept of a pinnacle or apex pose and how to build up to it in an orderly way:

1. What body parts need to strengthen?

2. What body parts need to stretch and open?

3. What key alignment principles or actions are necessary for success in this pose?

4. What preparatory poses would help?

Tips: Take your actual pose and look at it from various angles. What the pose looks like lying

down or seated, or upside down? Do the poses in your body and check it out! Know what

needed for the apex pose and make sure the students can do it. Have an alternate plan, a

variation, or modification for those who need it.

Test out your Theme & Sequence on a partner


 




Sequencing to Urdva Dhanurasana
Key considerations to prepare the body for Urdva Dhanurasana:

Open and align the 4 corners of the body, the shoulders and hips. In addition, the thighs (quadriceps) need to be stretched.

Actions:

Shoulder principles, inner spiral, and outer spiral

Category of poses with key actions leading to Urdva Dhanurasana:


Sitting- centering, meditation and breathing

Warm-up exercises

Surya Namaskar

Standing Poses- hips and low back (top of the thighbones back)

ParsvaKonasana

Trikonasana

Virabhadrasana 1


Thigh Stretches- hips and low back

Ardha Bhekasana

Eka Pada Rajakapotasana 1 prep

Eka Pada Rajakapotasana 2 prep


Backbend- shoulders and back ribs- full breath on all side of the ribcage, inner and outer spiral of the shoulders, hands

Bhujangasana

Makarasana

Dhanurasana

Setubandhasana

Urdva Dhanurasana


Twists and Forward Folds- Hips, legs, and lower back

Balasana

Parsva Upavishtha Konasana


Supine

Supta Padangusthasana- rooting femur head



Meditation and savasana


 

Anatomy Trains Discussion:

3 Holistic Networks:

Neural

Fibrous

Fluid


Tensegrity



Carlos Lineage:




 

Superficial Back Line


Connected and protects the entire posterior back line of the body. (SBL) Connected the tissue from the toes to the eyebrow on the head.


Postural Function:


Posterior: Back

Flexion & Extension occur in the Sagittal plane, anterior to posterior.

Flexion is a movement that makes the angle of the joint smaller (bending).

Extension makes the angle of the joint larger (straightening).


Isometric - Attachments are staying in relative position to each other. Muscles relatively neutral to each other.

Concentric - Attachments are moving toward each other.

Eccentric - Attachments are moving away from each other.


muscles
.pdf
Download PDF • 973KB

Abduction and Adduction occur in the Frontal Plane, medial to lateral.

Abduction means moving a part away from the midline of the body.

Adduction means moving a part toward the midline of the body.

Lateral flexion (side bending) of the spine also occurs in the Fontal plane.

Rotation occurs in the Transverse plane around the long axis of the body.

Internal (medial) rotation means toward the midline.

External (lateral) rotation means away from the midline.


Protraction is moving the chin or shoulder forward.

Retraction is moving back.





PDF Documents from end of class on themes & sequences below:




 

Homework Reading:


Submit a reflection of the topics covered this weekend.
Submit Observations of Classes (4 total):
Theme?
Elements of Class?
Voice & Projection?
Duration of Class?
Feedback for teacher

Below was an exampleof last weekend's assignment but it could have helped with Your sequence for this week (spirituality) :

First Sequence:

Seated, Theme Foundation (OTG) Earth, All fours, downdog, standing forward fold, triangle


Second Sequence:

Seated, Muscular energy & confidence, cat/cow, down dog, forward fold, mountain, triangle


Teaching Yoga Pg. 84-87, 88-104, 134-139

Anatomy Trains 1-97 (Write short reflection on reading) Extend up to Chapter 7.

Create a theme and sequence


8-9 Poses Up to 15minutes

1 peak pose

a theme

a choice of which UPA

Music is your choice

Your Instructor